4.2 C
Oklahoma
Wednesday, February 8, 2023

What Texas Editors Are Saying | National News

Elon Musk

- Advertisement -

Not so long ago, billionaire Elon Musk spent more time talking about Mars, rockets, electric cars and saving humanity than he did politics. Something in Texas’ water must have gotten to him since he moved here in 2020.

We wonder if his increasing forays into politics, combined with the distraction of his Twitter acquisition, could hurt his Texas endeavors, of which he has many.

His companies — SpaceX, Tesla, The Boring Co. and Neuralink — have growing operations throughout the state. From McGregor near Waco to Boca Chica by the Gulf, the tech mogul has invested much, employed thousands of Texans and made plenty of promises.

But instead of talking about how the Texas-made Starship rocket could someday help humans become multiplanetary, or SpaceX’s growing network of Starlink internet satellites, or how weird life will become with Neuralink brain implants, or the latest feature of Tesla’s Cybertruck, Musk has been shaking things up at and on Twitter.

If there is a “public perception” warning in one of Musk’s SpaceX control centers, its red lights are flashing and the alarms are sounding.

- Advertisement -

Some might see Tesla’s rough 2022 as the most obvious sign that something is awry. Its value plunged 65 percent, or $700 billion, over the year despite setting sales records and growing deliveries 40 percent.

Some say the Twitter deal coupled with Musk’s odd — and sometimes offensive, immature or politically charged — tweets are driving customers from Tesla.

Critics and fans alike point out that the stock market and other automakers struggled in 2022, Tesla is battling more competition in the electric vehicle space, and the “adjustment” is a natural phenomenon for an overvalued stock.

- Advertisement -

ERCOT

When a polar vortex descended toward Texas days before Christmas, Christine DeLisle was on edge.

As mayor of Leander, a hilly city of 67,000 just north of Austin, DeLisle knew that her constituents’ warmth through several days of freezing temperatures would be largely dependent on the sketchy reliability of Atmos Energy, the city’s natural gas provider.

Two years prior, when [a freeze] knocked out power for millions of Texans, Atmos cut off the gas supply for an entire subdivision in Leander, leaving more than 1,600 homes without heat for nearly a week. At a City Council meeting immediately afterwards, Atmos representatives apologized and gave the typical mea culpas, assuring such an outage would never happen again.

Then, three weeks ago, it happened again.

Despite Atmos having trucks stationed in Leander to deliver compressed gas if needed, residents began complaining to DeLisle about low gas pressure and outages on the first day of the freeze.

Local reporters told her that Atmos’ customer service phone line was shut off for the holiday break. DeLisle and a skeleton staff scrambled to set up a temporary warming center at a local church.

“It became clear that we weren’t even in the coldest part of the freeze yet and Atmos wasn’t able to deliver,” DeLisle told the editorial board. Fed up with the lack of accountability, she acknowledged that, while Texans tend to bristle at the idea of regulation over our energy sector, the result of the status quo is that companies such as Atmos get off scot-free despite putting customers at risk.

“I think maybe it’s time that we embrace a little more regulation than what we previously had,” DeLisle said.





story by The Texas Tribune Source link

Elon Musk

Not so long ago, billionaire Elon Musk spent more time talking about Mars, rockets, electric cars and saving humanity than he did politics. Something in Texas’ water must have gotten to him since he moved here in 2020.

We wonder if his increasing forays into politics, combined with the distraction of his Twitter acquisition, could hurt his Texas endeavors, of which he has many.

His companies — SpaceX, Tesla, The Boring Co. and Neuralink — have growing operations throughout the state. From McGregor near Waco to Boca Chica by the Gulf, the tech mogul has invested much, employed thousands of Texans and made plenty of promises.

But instead of talking about how the Texas-made Starship rocket could someday help humans become multiplanetary, or SpaceX’s growing network of Starlink internet satellites, or how weird life will become with Neuralink brain implants, or the latest feature of Tesla’s Cybertruck, Musk has been shaking things up at and on Twitter.

If there is a “public perception” warning in one of Musk’s SpaceX control centers, its red lights are flashing and the alarms are sounding.

Some might see Tesla’s rough 2022 as the most obvious sign that something is awry. Its value plunged 65 percent, or $700 billion, over the year despite setting sales records and growing deliveries 40 percent.

Some say the Twitter deal coupled with Musk’s odd — and sometimes offensive, immature or politically charged — tweets are driving customers from Tesla.

Critics and fans alike point out that the stock market and other automakers struggled in 2022, Tesla is battling more competition in the electric vehicle space, and the “adjustment” is a natural phenomenon for an overvalued stock.

ERCOT

When a polar vortex descended toward Texas days before Christmas, Christine DeLisle was on edge.

As mayor of Leander, a hilly city of 67,000 just north of Austin, DeLisle knew that her constituents’ warmth through several days of freezing temperatures would be largely dependent on the sketchy reliability of Atmos Energy, the city’s natural gas provider.

Two years prior, when [a freeze] knocked out power for millions of Texans, Atmos cut off the gas supply for an entire subdivision in Leander, leaving more than 1,600 homes without heat for nearly a week. At a City Council meeting immediately afterwards, Atmos representatives apologized and gave the typical mea culpas, assuring such an outage would never happen again.

Then, three weeks ago, it happened again.

Despite Atmos having trucks stationed in Leander to deliver compressed gas if needed, residents began complaining to DeLisle about low gas pressure and outages on the first day of the freeze.

Local reporters told her that Atmos’ customer service phone line was shut off for the holiday break. DeLisle and a skeleton staff scrambled to set up a temporary warming center at a local church.

“It became clear that we weren’t even in the coldest part of the freeze yet and Atmos wasn’t able to deliver,” DeLisle told the editorial board. Fed up with the lack of accountability, she acknowledged that, while Texans tend to bristle at the idea of regulation over our energy sector, the result of the status quo is that companies such as Atmos get off scot-free despite putting customers at risk.

“I think maybe it’s time that we embrace a little more regulation than what we previously had,” DeLisle said.





story by The Texas Tribune Source link

More articles

Latest article